The co-creators of the 1984 film This is Spinal Tap are suing their distribution company for hundreds of millions of dollars following an alleged breach of contract.

Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and Rob Reiner said that StudioCanal neglected agreed-upon rights and reports. The company reportedly did this to withhold shares of the profits owed to the plaintiffs. Breach of contract is no small matter, and if you find yourself on the wrong end a broken deal, you could also seek compensation.

Agreements to disagreements

Proving breach of contract can be a complex undertaking, but it likely boils down to several key factors:

  • Making deals: A legally binding promise, whether written or verbal, could prove to be enforceable in court. If you made an offer, the other party accepted it and you both stood to gain something, then you likely made a contract.
  • Halfway there: If you held up your end of the agreement, then you could be one step closer to showing a breach of contract. You might have trouble proving a breach if neither you nor your partners contributed anything in the end.
  • Coming up short: You’ll likely have to show that the other side didn’t live up to their end of the bargain. Skirting payouts through the means of creative bookkeeping is certainly one way a partner could be found in breach of contract.
  • Resulting in fallout: The final step might be showing that you suffered because of the breach. If you lose out on a share of the profits that your business partner then tries to withhold from you, you may be entitled to a settlement.

Contracts are generally made to benefit both parties, and provide recourse in the event one side doesn’t follow through. Make sure you get the compensation you deserve when your partner doesn’t come through, and you could find the reimbursement you deserve.